Aljayyousi Awarded DAAD grant for DH Project


Dr. Mohammad Aljayyousi, an IUP alumnus who got his PhD in Literature and Criticism with a dissertation focusing on Digital Humanities under the supervision of Dr. Ken Sherwood, has recently been awarded a DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) short term grant in Digital Humanities for his project on the digitization of novels and the creation of pedagogical tools for English majors through the digital medium. He has started his fellowship at the Cologne Center of eHumanities (CCeH) in Cologne, Germany this October (http://cceh.uni-koeln.de/).

Weinstein presents on Teaching, the "Wiki Way"

At the 2017 College Technology day, DHC Co-director Dan Weinstein presented “Strategies for Teaching with Co-Editable Digital Documents.”
In this session Dr. Weinstein will discussed and demonstrated strategies for constructing engaging, collaborative learning experiences in such co-editable digital spaces as Google Sites, Google Docs, and similar tools. Applications for collaborative documents in primary,
secondary, and university settings were explored.

Keywords Chat - Glitch Aesthetics, Weds. 4/5 at Noon

Doctoral student Bradley Markle will lead this week's discussion on "Glitch Aesthetics,"
which involves using errors and corruptions in digital transmission as a basis for making art.

#Keywords Chats on Digital Culture aim to foster a conversation on diverse digital culture topics outside of the classroom. Participants join in the round table discussion, enjoy illuminating "demos" and benefit from the expertise of a student or faculty chat leader.

Keywords Chat - Flarf, Weds. 3/22

Click to Zoom.

Prof. Ken Sherwood will lead the next chat in the #Keywords series. "Flarf is an early twenty-first century neologism ... to describe a poetic composition tactic specific to networked digital media, the sensibility that informs it, and, eventually a poetic movement.... Flarf composition typically involves the application of constraint based appropriate to digital media; in Flarf, this often involves burrowing into Google search results for inappropriate, awkward, obscene, or otherwise non-literary text." (Flarf, Darrwn Wershler).

#Keywords Chats on Digital Culture aim to foster a conversation on diverse digital culture topics outside of the classroom. Participants join in the round table discussion, enjoy illuminating "demos" and benefit from the expertise of a student or faculty chat leader.

DHC Co-Sponsors Art+Feminism Wiki Edit-a-thon


Stapleton Library, in collaboration with Women and Gender Studies and the Center for Digital Humanities and Culture at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, hosted an Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon March 8, from 10:00am to 1:00pm, in 201 Stabley.

This 3-hour event improved coverage of women and the arts on Wikipedia and encourage female editorship.

IUP volunteers edited 15 articles. There were 74 total edits committed by 24 different editors.

The edit-a-thon included an introductory talk, tutorials for the beginner Wikipedian, ongoing editing support, reference materials, and refreshments.

In a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of its contributors identify as female. This lack of female participation has led to an alarming dearth of content about women and art in the world’s most popular online research tool.

Art+Feminism’s Edit-a-thons and other initiatives make an impact on the gender gap through crucial improvements to art and feminism related subjects on Wikipedia. Since 2014, over 280 Art+Feminism edit-a-thons have taken place across the work, creating and improving an estimated 4,600 articles.

Keywords Chat - Interactive Fiction, Weds 3/1

Graduate student Zainab Younus will lead the next chat in the #Keywords series. Interactive Fiction is considered a form of born-digital literature and forerunner to contemporary narrative video games. Ranging from text based adventures, to commercial products in the 1980s and 1990s, to contemporary fan fiction in the present -- IF continues to fascinate reader/players and writer/programmers.

Zainab has generously shared her ** Interactive Fiction Slides ** . If you miss the Chat, you will find still find the slides and the links to classic IF works very useful!

#Keywords Chats on Digital Culture aim to foster a conversation on diverse digital culture topics outside of the classroom. Participants join in the round table discussion, enjoy illuminating "demos" and benefit from the expertise of a student or faculty chat leader.

#Keywords - Chats on Digital Culture Series Launches for Spring 2017

The DHC launched the #Keywords (Chats in Digital Culture) with an exciting discussion on Machinima, led by graduate student Mark DiMauro. We had a wonderful discussion and shared some interesting examples.

The 14 attendees at our first session selected some topics for future discussions.

    Further Spring Events
  • 3/1 Interactive Fiction
  • 3/22 Flarf
  • 4/5 Glitch Aesthetics
  • 4/19 Quest Narrative

Keywords


The DHC is proud to announce #Keywords, an ongoing brown-bag lunch series this spring semester. #Keywords is an informal, educated discussion on key terms and language in use in the digital humanities today.Our hope is that through a brief introduction and informal conversation you can become better acquainted with this terminology, what it means, how it works, and why students find it important.No prior knowledge of any digital humanities topics are required to join in the conversation! We all hope to learn from one another and bring this knowledge into the classroom in the form of projects, handouts, and lesson plans.The first event will be hosted on Wed, Feb. 15 at noon in the Sutton third floor alcove. We'll be discussing Machinima, presented by Mark DiMauro. Food will be provided, so join us and let's talk about the future of the digital humanities!

Video 1, Video 2 - Machinima, Johns Hopkins Guide to Digital Media

Creative Coding Brings Together Art, Humanities, and Technology

Enthusiastic undergraduate and graduate students from Art and English worked with visitor Tony Duvfa to explore creative coding using Processing. The introductory workshop, co-sponsored by the Department of English exposed non-programmers to "sketching" with code.

Processing or P5.js is a language and programming approach developed at MIT that aims "to make coding accessible for artists, designers, educators, and beginners, and reinterprets this for today's web." Increasingly, this approach is also being adopted in the humanities as a means to develop "code-literacy" or to encourage what MIT Professor Nick Montfort, in a book by the title, calls "Exploratory Programming."

Whether employed for analytical purposes in the humanities or creative purposes in the arts, Processing enables novices to engage deeply in learning algorithmic thinking.

Based on the success of the workshop and enthusiasm of participants, members of the IUP community will be invited to join in regular meetings of a "Creative Coding Circle" which will begin meeting in Spring 2017.

Creative Coding - Coffee Talk and Workshop

Enlarge poster to print.

"Creative" or "Exploratory" coding involves teaching programming fundamentals to allow people outside of computer science to gain agency in the digital domain.

Through a Coffee Talk (Tues, 9am, Sutton 352) and a free, hands-on workshop (Weds, 9am, Sutton 352), Tomi Dufva invites members of the IUP community to become acquainted with the ways expression and the understanding of code can go together.

Tomi Dufva is co-founder of a school integrating coding an art for children. If you have interests in Video Game studies, Digital literature, Digital humanities or allied fields, please come to the Coffee Talk tomorrow morning or consider attending the hands-on workshop this Wednesday.