digital pedagogy

Textspace Wiki – Collaborative Workspace in English 202

• Link to Class Discussion Notes http://sherwoodweb.org/wiki/index.php/Class_notes_on_fieldwork
• Link to Collaborative Exercise- Writing an Introduction http://sherwoodweb.org/wiki/index.php/Develop_An_Introduction_Exercise
• Link to Group Activity – Articles with Open Questions http://sherwoodweb.org/wiki/index.php/Articles_with_Open_Questions

The Wiki is a multi-authoring environment that facilitates collaborative writing, editing and publishing. It is familiar to many from the popular website wikipedia. The basic principle is that any reader can become a writer; once registered, he or she can edit content, making additions, corrections, and deletions. I have provided the same platform tool (mediawiki) as a collaborative workspace for students in Research Writing. The links above illustrate three example uses; readers are free to browse the wiki and view archives of prior classes uses.

The first use is for the preparation and sharing of class discussion notes. Here the wiki functions much alike a blackboard, where the instructor summarizes key points that emerge in the course of a class discussion. The advantage here is that this documentation of class discussion is displayed during class and then is also saved and published for subsequent student review. Not only does it save the student taking notes (for better or worse), it assists in formally converting students’ informal, oral classroom comments and participation into course content.

The second example is a collaborative writing exercise. The “hot links” on this page open to introductions authored by groups of 3-5 students and published during classtime (class is conducted in a lab). This use allowed for students to illustrate their understanding of a writing technique, but unlike traditional methods of submission, the wiki allowed us to review this student work during class AND make these models available for students to consult and emulate in their own writing process.

The third example provides the record of in-class presentations on how to derive “Open Questions” from an assigned reading. Student groups read the assignment as homework, then discussed orally, composed, and then presented to the class the questions they derived from a given reading.



Created by: admin. Last Modification: Wednesday 05 of December, 2007 22:52:18 MST by admin.
The original document is available at http://www.iupdhc.org/wiki/tiki-index.php?page=digital%20pedagogy